Shop Recycled: Fine Furniture at Extraordinary Prices at The Gathering Place Warehouse Sale, July 11–12

Some of Northeast Ohio’s finest gently used furniture will be available at The Gathering Place Warehouse Home Furnishings Sale:

  • Saturday, July 11, 9 A.M.–2 P.M.
  • Sunday, July 12, 10 A.M.–1 P.M.

This Spectacular Summer Sale features fine traditional American furniture … dining room furniture … and lots of great outdoor furniture. Click here for a look at some examples of the fine merchandise available at this event.

Sign: The Gathering Place Warehouse Sale

Look for this sign at The Gathering Place Warehouse Sale

The sale takes place at The Gathering Place Warehouse, 4911 Commerce Parkway, Warrensville Heights, Ohio (map). (Note that this is a different location from The Gathering Place.) Terms for all purchases are cash or credit cards only.

Readers of this blog can receive a $25 coupon to be used during this sale. To receive details and the coupon, use the Leave a Reply box, below, to send me your name, your email address, and the message Send coupon.

The Gathering Place Warehouse gift cards will also be available for purchase during the sale.

The Gathering Place Warehouse accepts gently used furniture and other household items for resale. If you have items that you would like to donate, please contact Outreach Coordinator Cheryl Apisdorf (216-595-9546 or apisdorf@touchedbycancer.org). Please note that The Gathering Place does not accept drop-off donations of furniture or household items at its Beachwood or Westlake locations or at its warehouse.

Funds raised by The Gathering Place Warehouse Home Furnishings Sale support the many free programs and services at The Gathering Place for individuals and families touched by cancer.

Shop recycled at The Gathering Place Warehouse Home Furnishings Sale: save money, take home beautiful things and keep fine home furnishings from going to waste.

Want to stay in touch with the latest recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page, or subscribe to my Examiner.com page.

Lake County Household Hazardous Waste Collection: Saturday, June 6

Lake County residents are encouraged to collect their household hazardous waste and deliver it on Saturday, June 6, to the Lake County Fairgrounds at 1301 Mentor Avenue in Painesville Township (map).

  • Materials will be accepted only at the Lake County Fairgrounds and only on Saturday, June 6, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • The collection will take place no matter what the weather is.
  • Technicians will unload your vehicle.
  • This collection is for Lake County residents only. Items from businesses will not be accepted.
  • Leave the product in its original container if possible, or label the contents if you know what they are.

For information on materials that will and will not be accepted, see the Lake County Solid Waste District web site (scroll down to “Hazardous Waste Collection — June 6, 2015”).

The Solid Waste District collects hazardous wastes because they are dangerous to people, pets, and the environment. Take them to the Lake County Fairgrounds on hazardous waste collection day, and you will Keep Them Out of the Landfill.

Cuyahoga County Residents: Household hazardous waste is collected in Cuyahoga by each municipality’s service department. See the Cuyahoga County Solid Waste Management District’s Household Hazardous Waste Disposal Program web page for information about municipal collections.

Want to stay in touch with the latest recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page, or subscribe to my Examiner.com page.

Local organics composter Rust Belt Riders wins $20K grant

Rust Belt Riders, the Northeast Ohio bicycle-riding organic recyclers who collect food waste from local restaurants, schools, and homes, have won a $20,000 grant that will help them manage customer relations, improve their billing processes, and expand their bicycles-and-trailers collection fleet.

The grant came from Social Enterprise Accelerator (SEA) Change of Northeast Ohio.

Rust Belt Riders grew out of a local community garden’s need for soil improvement. The gardening group, all employed in food service, realized that the soil amendment they were purchasing for the garden could be replaced by gathering the food waste at their work sites and composting it for use in the garden.

compost

Composted food waste becomes a soil amendment in the hands of Rust Belt Riders.

Seeing the value of their market for food waste, Rust Belt Riders began charging to collect it from local restaurants and, eventually, schools and households. (Read more at the Waste 360, WasteDIVE, and Rust Belt Riders websites.)

Rust Belt Riders are putting food waste where it belongs —in the garden — and Keeping It Out of the Landfill.

Want to stay in touch with the latest Zero Waste news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page, or subscribe to my Examiner.com page.

Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story airs tonight on MSNBC

This evening, Wednesday, April 22 — Earth Day 2015 — MSNBC will premiere “Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story.”

According to the announcement on Adweek magazine’s website, the documentary “examines how much food humans waste and the resulting costs to our economy, our climate, and our health” — as much as 40 percent of what’s grown becomes food waste. The filmmakers highlighted this issue when they “gave up traditional grocery shopping for six months and instead rely exclusively on food that would have otherwise been thrown out.”

Various preview clips are available at msnbc.com and adweek.com. The show airs Wednesday, April 22 at 10 p.m. Eastern time on MSNBC.

In January 2012, the Food Network addressed this issue with “The Big Waste,” in which two teams of Food Network chefs (Cleveland’s own Iron Chef Mike Symon was one of them) competed to create a dinner “worthy of their great reputations” using only food on its way to the trash. Video clips from the show are available on the Food Network website.

Food waste upsets me. Sending some of it to food banks or other redistributors solves a small part of the problem. Turning some of it to compost solves a little more. Extracting it from wastewater and turning it into energy or fertilizer takes another small bite. But the sad fact is that too much food rots in the field or ends up as sewage or in landfills, where it becomes an environmental hazard.

Watch “Just Eat It.” Food is for nutrition. Keep It Out of the Landfill.

Want to stay in touch with the latest recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page, or subscribe to my Examiner.com page.

Local executives named SWANA Ohio Executives of the Year

The Ohio Buckeye Chapter of the Solid Waste District Association of North America (SWANA) has named two local sustainability managers 2014 executives of the year.

SWANA Ohio Executives of the Year 2014

SWANA Ohio Executives of the Year 2014

 

Diane Bickett, Executive Director , Cuyahoga County Solid Waste Management District: 2014 Professional of the Year

A member of the Solid Waste District since its formation in 1995, Deputy Director of the Solid Waste District 1998–2009, and Executive Director since 2009, Diane Bickett numbers among her accomplishments:

  • Her role in the formation of the Cuyahoga County Paper Marketing Cooperative.
  • Her leadership in establishing the Cuyahoga County Solid Waste District’s Household Hazardous Waste Collection, now Ohio’s largest HHW collection.
  • Opening of the District’s Special Waste Convenience Center, in 2011, providing Cuyahoga County communities a 5 days/week drop-off for HHW, and earning recognition for the District in 2012 as Solid Waste Operator of the Year.

The full text of Diane’s award recognition can be found on the SWANA Ohio Buckeye Chapter website.

Nancy Hughes, Cleveland Metroparks Sustainability Manager: Solid Waste Operator of the Year

As Sustainability Manager of the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, Nancy Hughes is responsible for:

  • Management of the zoo’s on-site composting program, which processes the facility’s annual production of 4,000 cubic yards of manure from elephants and other large herbivores and incorporates other vegetative material to produce sweet-smelling compost used throughout the zoo’s many gardens.
  • Management of recycling programs used for zoo operations and supporting vendors, including computer equipment, aluminum cans, pallets, paper and cardboard, florescent bulbs, inkjet cartridges, cell phones, etc.
  • Development and management of the zoo’s comprehensive education and awareness program for schools, businesses, organizations, and other zoos.

Through Nancy’s influence, the zoo’s Master Plan includes a sustainability goal, and, as a founding member of ZeroWaste NEO, she continues to promote the principles of Zero Waste throughout the community.

The full text of Nancy’s award recognition can be found on the SWANA Ohio Buckeye Chapter website.

Want to stay in touch with the latest recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page, or subscribe to my Examiner.com page.

After a challenging year, Keep It Out of the Landfill is back at work.

I last posted to Keep It Out of the Landfill on October 28 of last year. At that time, I was nearing the end of an eighteen-week cycle of chemotherapy, subsequent to cancer surgery in April and May of 2014.

Pink Ribbon

photo credit: Messer Woland

Not to worry: the surgeries had gone well, chemo was, except for a serious lack of energy, relatively trouble-free, and follow-up scans were clear. By early December, I was looking forward to radiation therapy (“looking forward” in the sense of “let’s get past this”) and the return of my hair, and hoping to resume a normal writing schedule within a few more weeks.

But life had other plans for me. On December 16, I broke my left hip. (Again, not to panic: a hemi hip replacement the following day, therapy beginning the day after, and discharge to a rehab facility on December 21 quickly dispelled my initial fear that I would spend the rest of my life in a wheelchair.) After about three weeks in rehab, I came home, ambulatory and able (thanks to some outstanding physical and occupational therapists) to live my life — if, for now, a little more slowly than before.

While all this has taken time, I am now getting back to one of the driving passions of my life: Keep It Out of the Landfill. And I’ve realized that I need to narrow my focus: the universe of solid waste management is too large for me to address with the resources at my disposal.

So while my blog will continue to discuss various aspects of solid waste management, future posts will largely concentrate on the issues about which I have the strongest feelings: food waste and extended producer responsibility.

Over the next couple of weeks, I’ll explain how those two issues fit into the solid waste management universe and why I chose to focus on them. Meanwhile, treasure every moment of your life. And every day, aim for zero solid waste: Keep It Out of the Landfill.

Shop Recycled This Saturday, November 1: The Gathering Place Warehouse Home Furnishings Sale

Selected items are priced at 20% off this Saturday at The Gathering Place Warehouse Home Furnishings Sale. The warehouse is overflowing with new merchandise to match items on your gift list or wish list. (For an example of furniture offered at previous sales, click here.)

Mark your calendar with the date and time for this one-day sale:

  • Saturday, November 1, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.
The Gathering Place Warehouse Sale driveway sign

Look for this sign at the driveway entrance to The Gathering Place Warehouse Sale.

The sale takes place at The Gathering Place Warehouse, 4911 Commerce Parkway, Warrensville Heights, Ohio (map). (Note that this is a different location from The Gathering Place.) Terms for all purchases are cash or credit cards only.

The Gathering Place Warehouse accepts gently used furniture and other household items for resale. If you have items that you would like to donate, please contact Outreach Coordinator Cheryl Apisdorf (216-595-9546 or apisdorf@touchedbycancer.org.). Please note that The Gathering Place does not accept drop-off donations of furniture or household items at its Beachwood or Westlake locations or at its warehouse.

Funds raised by The Gathering Place Warehouse Home Furnishings Sale support the many free programs and services at The Gathering Place for individuals and families touched by cancer.

Shop recycled at The Gathering Place Warehouse Home Furnishings Sale: save money, take home beautiful things and keep fine home furnishings from going to waste.

Want to stay in touch with the latest in recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page, or subscribe to my Examiner.com page.