Too much stuff? “Pass It On!”

Need to make some room before the gift-giving starts? Donate unwanted clothes, toys, and other items to a local non-profit organization that accepts donations.

Pass It On: A Resource-Full Guide to Donating Usable Stuff

Image courtesy of the Cuyahoga County Solid Waste Management District.

The Cuyahoga County Solid Waste Management District publishes a book called “Pass It On: A Resource-Full Guide to Donating Usable Stuff” that lists over 125 local organizations, most of them in Cuyahoga County, that accept donations year-round. (Some of these organizations will pick up donated goods, but may not offer pickups outside the county.)

If your mailing address is in Cuyahoga County, you can order a copy of the book by calling (216) 698-2265 or online from the Solid Waste District’s website.

If you’re outside Cuyahoga County, or if you prefer the less wasteful online version, you can view it online as a PDF on the District’s website or use their searchable database, which may have more current information than the book, which was published in July 2014. (Scroll down to “Items to Donate.”)

Make this holiday season a little greener: use “Pass It On” to find destinations for your unwanted belongings.

(My thanks to the Cuyahoga County Solid Waste Management District for permission to quote part of this material from their online newsletter, Talking Trash.)

Want to stay in touch with the latest recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page.

“Recycling” energy: Players on soccer field generate energy to power floodlights

If you’ve ever watched a bunch of kids on a playground and thought, too bad we can’t bottle that energy and use it later, you can relate to this story.

What if we could capture and reuse all that energy?

What if we could capture and reuse all that energy?(Photo credit: Eoin Gardiner)

In a shantytown in Rio de Janeiro, Shell and Brazilian soccer legend Pele have dedicated a community soccer field that captures and stores the players’ own energy, combines it with power from nearby solar panels, and converts it to energy that powers floodlights, giving the soccer field and the community a safe and secure nighttime space.

Read the story, watch the video here.

Want to stay in touch with the latest recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page, or subscribe to my Examiner.com page.