Habitat for Humanity Opens New Lake County ReStore in Eastlake

On August 6, 2016, Lake-Geauga Habitat for Humanity brought ReStore shopping back to Lake County with their new store at 34225 Vine Street in Eastlake.

The store is open for business Fridays and Saturdays between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. and accepts donations Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. (For more information about the new ReStore, as well as the organization’s other current projects in Lake County, see Kristi Garabrandt’s article in the Thursday, August 4, 2016 issue of the News-Herald.)

Besides Habitat for Humanity’s work in providing affordable new and rehabbed housing for local families, their ReStores serve the Recycling/Zero Waste community by providing:

  • A destination for donating such items as furniture, tools, electronics, housewares, and appliances.
  • An affordable resource for purchase of such items.

Click here for more information about Lake-Geauga Habitat for Humanity.

For a look at my own experience as a ReStore shopper, see my blog post Shopping Recycled: How I Replaced My Jenn-Air Range at the Habitat for Humanity ReStore and Saved Over $2,000.

Want to stay in touch with the latest recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page.

Shop Recycled: Habitat for Humanity to Open New ReStore in Eastlake

Great news for the local Recycling/Zero Waste community: according to a report earlier this month in the News-Herald, Lake-Geauga Habitat for Humanity will open a 17,000-square-foot retail store in the old Sears outlet facility at 34255 Vine Street in Eastlake. (Click here to read the News-Herald article.)

Habitat ReStores are retail stores open to the public. By accepting donations of new and gently used furniture, housewares, building materials, tools, plumbing, electrical supplies, etc., ReStores are able to resell these items at 50%–75% off retail prices. Low prices save money for savvy shoppers, and the proceeds help Habitat for Humanity to build affordable housing for low-income families.

A little over two years ago, I reported the closing of the Lake County Habitat for Humanity Painesville ReStore. (Read the full article here.) About a year ago, Geauga County Habitat for Humanity, now Lake-Geauga Habitat for Humanity, became Habitat International’s affiliate organization for Lake County. (Read the News-Herald report here.)

The new store, expected to open in July 2016, will be in addition to the Geauga County ReStore in Newbury and, at least initially, will maintain the same hours as the Newbury store, Fridays and Saturdays, 9 am–5 pm.

Habitat for Humanity provides affordable housing for families in need by building new homes and rehabbing abandoned properties which would otherwise be demolished. Renovation instead of demolition reuses much of the existing structure, thus keeping building materials out of the landfill. Reuse of materials donated to Habitat’s ReStores helps contain building costs and makes use of what otherwise is likely to be discarded. (How much can you save by shopping at a Habitat for Humanity ReStore? I saved over $2,000 when I purchased my Jenn-Air range at a local ReStore. Read the full story here.)

Habitat for Humanity ReStores: Keeping Building Materials Out of the Landfill.

Want to stay in touch with the latest zero waste and recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page.

Recycling Real Estate: Greater Cleveland Habitat for Humanity Is Now Rehabbing Foreclosed, Abandoned Properties

Greater Cleveland Habitat for Humanity is moving aggressively to rehabilitate and restore some of Cleveland’s neighborhoods that were most seriously damaged by the foreclosure crisis. Rather than building new housing, the organization is now adopting neighborhoods and rehabbing abandoned foreclosed properties.

House currently being rehabbed by Greater Cleveland Habitat for Humanity

House currently being rehabbed by Greater Cleveland Habitat for Humanity (Photo courtesy of Greater Cleveland Habitat for Humanity)

Here’s what I love about this move:

  • Habitat for Humanity can rehab a property and sell it to new homeowners for, in some cases, significantly less than $50,000, whereas costs for new housing units can easily approach $200,000 each. This not only makes home ownership affordable for more potential owners, it allows Habitat for Humanity to produce three or four rehabbed houses for the cost of one brand new house.
  • By focusing on selected streets, the process can revitalize an entire neighborhood, thus protecting — even increasing — the value of existing properties. In fact, Habitat for Humanity provides help with exterior repairs for existing residents in target neighborhoods.
  • Renovation instead of demolition reuses much of the existing structure, thus keeping building materials out of the landfill.
  • Rehabbing — restoring — existing homes, instead of replacing them with new construction, preserves the character of our historic neighborhoods.
  • Using materials donated to the Habitat for Humanity ReStore helps contain construction costs and makes use of what might otherwise be discarded.

The rehab process does, however, offer more serious challenges than new housing:

  • Obtaining clear title to a foreclosed, abandoned property is a time-consuming process, and until that process is complete, the property continues to be a blight on the neighborhood.
  • Because Greater Cleveland Habitat for Humanity is adopting and focusing on specific streets in neighborhoods that need a lot of work — currently Colfax Road in Lower Kinsman and Clement Avenue in Slavic Village — the properties may not be perceived as desirable by potential homeowners.

For more information about Habitat for Humanity’s current rehab work, see Greater Cleveland Habitat for Humanity’s Current Construction web page. Click on any of the photographs to open a slide show of rehab work in process on the property.

To see the many results of recent rehab projects, go to the Home Dedications page. Clicking on any photograph will open a slide show of the property’s dedication ceremony.

Greater Cleveland Habitat for Humanity Executive Director John Habat discussed this change in the organization’s approach as a guest columnist for Cleveland.com on June 10, 2014.

Reduce, reuse, repurpose, rehab, recycle.
Keep neighborhoods from going to waste.
Keep building materials out of the landfill.

Want to stay in touch with the latest recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page, or subscribe to my Examiner.com page.

How to restore an iron frying pan

If you shop recycled and you’ve been lucky enough to pick up a couple pieces of iron cookware at a garage sale or thrift shop, you’ll probably need to remove some rust before you can use your new treasures.

iron skillets, restored and original condition

Properly restored, a rusty iron skillet can take its place among your favorite cookware. (photo credit: FiveRings)

The restoration process is not complicated, but it takes a little time. A recent posting by Jason Carpenter on Mentor Patch turns it into a weekend project and provides extensive detail.

If your iron skillet is looking a little red around the edges, or you’ve inherited your grandmother’s Dutch oven and you want to prepare her recipe for chicken with dumplings, try Jason’s method. When you finish, you’ll have classic cookware that’s versatile and nearly indestructible.

Want to stay in touch with the latest recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page, or subscribe to my Examiner.com page.