Shop Recycled: Habitat for Humanity to Open New ReStore in Eastlake

Great news for the local Recycling/Zero Waste community: according to a report earlier this month in the News-Herald, Lake-Geauga Habitat for Humanity will open a 17,000-square-foot retail store in the old Sears outlet facility at 34255 Vine Street in Eastlake. (Click here to read the News-Herald article.)

Habitat ReStores are retail stores open to the public. By accepting donations of new and gently used furniture, housewares, building materials, tools, plumbing, electrical supplies, etc., ReStores are able to resell these items at 50%–75% off retail prices. Low prices save money for savvy shoppers, and the proceeds help Habitat for Humanity to build affordable housing for low-income families.

A little over two years ago, I reported the closing of the Lake County Habitat for Humanity Painesville ReStore. (Read the full article here.) About a year ago, Geauga County Habitat for Humanity, now Lake-Geauga Habitat for Humanity, became Habitat International’s affiliate organization for Lake County. (Read the News-Herald report here.)

The new store, expected to open in July 2016, will be in addition to the Geauga County ReStore in Newbury and, at least initially, will maintain the same hours as the Newbury store, Fridays and Saturdays, 9 am–5 pm.

Habitat for Humanity provides affordable housing for families in need by building new homes and rehabbing abandoned properties which would otherwise be demolished. Renovation instead of demolition reuses much of the existing structure, thus keeping building materials out of the landfill. Reuse of materials donated to Habitat’s ReStores helps contain building costs and makes use of what otherwise is likely to be discarded. (How much can you save by shopping at a Habitat for Humanity ReStore? I saved over $2,000 when I purchased my Jenn-Air range at a local ReStore. Read the full story here.)

Habitat for Humanity ReStores: Keeping Building Materials Out of the Landfill.

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The Facts About Goodwill Industries

For several years, some of my friends and family have been telling me that they won’t donate to or shop at Goodwill Industries because their chief executive is overpaid and their workers get paid very little.

I finally checked this out. According to Snopes.com (accurate information for Goodwill is about 4/5 of the way down the page), it was never true, and it certainly isn’t true now.

Here’s how some legitimate sources evaluate Goodwill Industries:

Let’s put this outrageous calumny where it belongs: in the landfill!

Want to stay in touch with the latest zero waste and recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page.

Microbeads: These Things Belong in the Landfill

From the December 14, 2015 issue of online publication Waste Dive:

A bill that would completely ban the manufacturing or sale of bath products and cosmetics containing microbeads by 2019 is pending a final approval from the U.S. Senate this week before heading to President Obama’s desk. If a vote is quickly made and the bill is signed, it could be made a law before the year’s end. (Read more.)

For years, many soaps, scrubs, and other personal care products have included, as an exfoliating agent, tiny plastic beads. These microbeads enter the wastewater system, where they are too small for most filtration systems to remove them. So they enter our lakes, streams, and groundwater and, because they are plastic, they attract toxins. As a result:

  • They pollute our water.
  • They make their way into the food chain.
  • They poison the animals that mistake them for food.
  • They may end up on your dinner plate, and perhaps your drinking water.

Learn more about microbeads here and here.

How can you tell whether a product contains microbeads? Look at the label: polyethylene or polypropylene means that the product contains plastic. Sometimes you need only look at the front of the package: if it says microbeads, there’s your clue.

For lists of products that contain microbeads, click here and here. For microbead-free products, click here. (Note: these lists are not exhaustive.) To examine a specific product’s ingredients list, search the web for the product name. The manufacturer’s website may list the ingredients, and I’ve found this information for many products on drugstore.com.

Several years ago, before I ever heard about microbeads, I purchased a facial scrub. Great exfoliant — I loved it! I picked up a couple more tubes so I wouldn’t run out.

Then I learned — it contains microbeads. Much as I hate to throw anything into the trash, that’s where this product is going, right to the landfill. At least there it will be kept out of our groundwater and sewer systems.

If you’re interested in following the waste management industry — landfills, collections, recycling, waste-to-energy, and much more — consider signing up for Waste Dive’s daily online newsletter. More information is available here.

Want to stay in touch with the latest zero waste and recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page.

Shiloh Industries: 11th Location Is Landfill Free

Congratulations to Valley City, Ohio’s Shiloh Industries for reaching landfill-free status at eleven of its facilities — all of its locations in Europe and Mexico, and five of its U.S. plants — and for continued progress toward total landfill-free status at its remaining plants, which are now an average of 97.4% landfill-free.

Shiloh Industries, #32 in Forbes magazine’s 2014 list of America’s Best Small Companies, has reached this milestone by utilizing recyclable raw materials and identifying alternative solutions for the waste produced. Through the first ten months of the fiscal year ending October 31, 2015, the Medina County based company has kept 220 million pounds of waste material out of landfills.

Want to stay in touch with the latest recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page.

Too much stuff? “Pass It On!”

Need to make some room before the gift-giving starts? Donate unwanted clothes, toys, and other items to a local non-profit organization that accepts donations.

Pass It On: A Resource-Full Guide to Donating Usable Stuff

Image courtesy of the Cuyahoga County Solid Waste Management District.

The Cuyahoga County Solid Waste Management District publishes a book called “Pass It On: A Resource-Full Guide to Donating Usable Stuff” that lists over 125 local organizations, most of them in Cuyahoga County, that accept donations year-round. (Some of these organizations will pick up donated goods, but may not offer pickups outside the county.)

If your mailing address is in Cuyahoga County, you can order a copy of the book by calling (216) 698-2265 or online from the Solid Waste District’s website.

If you’re outside Cuyahoga County, or if you prefer the less wasteful online version, you can view it online as a PDF on the District’s website or use their searchable database, which may have more current information than the book, which was published in July 2014. (Scroll down to “Items to Donate.”)

Make this holiday season a little greener: use “Pass It On” to find destinations for your unwanted belongings.

(My thanks to the Cuyahoga County Solid Waste Management District for permission to quote part of this material from their online newsletter, Talking Trash.)

Want to stay in touch with the latest recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page.

Shop Recycled: The Gathering Place Warehouse Home Furnishings Sale Dec. 5 and 6

The Gathering Place Has You Covered

for the Holidays

____________________
Beautiful Holiday Decorations
Wonderful Stocking Stuffers
Great New Costume Jewelry Selection 

 ____________________

 

  • Saturday, December 5th ~ 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
  • Sunday, December 6th ~ 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
              ______________________ 
4911 Commerce Parkway
Warrensville Heights
(map)

Click here  to see an example of the fine furniture for sale at this event.
Cash or Credit Cards Only.

Follow The Gathering Place on Instagram or Twitter and you will be entered into a drawing to win a $25 gift certificate to The Gathering Place Warehouse. Share or retweet this post and you’ll be entered again. Four chances to win.
Winners will be contacted through their Instagram or Twitter.

For more information call 216.595.9546
All proceeds support the free programs and services at The Gathering Place  or individuals and families touched by cancer
Coupon

Business Recycling Roundtable at Solid Waste District, Thursday, Nov. 5

Businesses that have attended the “Waste and Recycling $ense for Your Business” seminar at the Cuyahoga County Solid Waste District are invited to return to the District to participate in the first peer-to-peer business recycling discussion group. (Click here for a flyer describing the event.)

Meet with commercial, industrial, institutional, and other businesses who have attended the seminar. Talk about the seminar and your experiences with workplace programs for waste reduction and recycling.

  • Talk about what worked — and what didn’t
  • Learn how others overcame challenges.
  • Did you take photos — before/after, candid shots of people recycling, grip-and-grin awards ceremonies, kickoff events, celebration events? Bring them along!

Doreen Schreiber, the District’s Business Recycling Specialist, will facilitate the roundtable.

The roundtable will be held at the Cuyahoga County Solid Waste District (click here for address and map), Thursday, Nov. 5, 2–4 p.m. The event is free, but registration is required (click here to register). For more information, contact Doreen Schreiber at 216-443-3732, or dschreiber@cuyahogacounty.us.

Want to stay in touch with the latest recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page.

Shop Recycled: The Gathering Place Warehouse Sale Oct. 24–25

Beautiful New Merchandise

$25 coupon for this sale only

Specially Priced Home Collectibles
Costume Jewelry
Pottery by Ann Friedman
  ____________________
      Saturday, October 24th ~ 9:00am-2:00pm
       Sunday, October 25th~ 10:00am-1:00pm
              _______________________
4911 Commerce Parkway
Warrensville Heights
_______________________

Click here to see an example of the fine furniture and accessories for sale at this event.

Cash or Credit Cards Only.

Follow The Gathering Place on Instagram or Twitter and you will be entered into a drawing to win a $25 gift certificate to The Gathering Place Warehouse. Share or retweet the posts and you’ll be entered again. Four chances to win.
Winners will be contacted through their Instagram or Twitter accounts.

For more information call 216.595.9546
All proceeds support the free programs and services at The Gathering Place for individuals and families touched by cancer.
 

The Gathering Place Warehouse

Bring in this coupon for $25 off purchase
of one item priced $100 or more.

(One coupon per transaction.
Valid only October 24 & 25, 2015)

Recycling prescription drugs in Ohio

A New York Times article that appeared in the Sunday, October 11 Plain Dealer included this interesting paragraph:

In some states, prescriptions for noncontrolled substances — those with vastly lower risks for misuse and addiction — are collected and redistributed to those in need. Social services officials in Tulsa, Okla., have about 20 retired doctors who retrieve surplus prescription drugs from dozens of area long-term-care facilities and take them to a pharmacy where they are checked, sorted and donated to low-income residents.

What a wonderful idea, I thought. And why don’t we do that in Ohio?

So I mounted my high horse and wrote four hundred indignant words challenging Ohio to emulate Oklahoma and develop such a program.

Then, just to be safe, I googled “donate unused prescription drugs Ohio,.” and am I ever glad I did. I saved myself one big embarrassment, because Ohio authorized such a program in 2003.

The program authorizes the donation of prescription drugs by only a pharmacy, drug manufacturer, health care facility, or government entity, not by individuals. And the drugs may be dispensed (not sold) by a pharmacy, hospital, or nonprofit clinic to eligible individuals only.

Want to learn more?

  • For general information about the drug repository program, see this page on the Ohio Health Care Association website.
  • For legal specifications for the program, see Section 3715.87 of the Ohio Revised Code.
  • For a history of drug repository programs in Ohio and other states, see this page on the National Conference of State Legislatures website.

When my doctor takes me off a prescription, I’m still stuck with the leftovers, but now I don’t feel so bad about it. I understand why I can’t donate them — once the drug leaves the pharmacy, it’s lost its integrity. So I take them to one of our local Lake County drug drop-off sites. (Cuyahoga County has a similar program: see Disposal of Medicine & Needles on the Cuyahoga County Solid Waste District’s website.)

Recycling prescription medications: a Zero Waste program that works for Ohio

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Last 2015 Workplace Recycling/Waste Contracting Workshop Sep. 24

The Cuyahoga County Solid Waste District will present its popular workshop, “Waste and Recycling $ense for Your Business,” on Thursday, September 24, for the final time in 2015.

The Cuyahoga County Solid Waste District conducts Waste and Recycling $ense for Your Business workshops

The Cuyahoga County Solid Waste District conducts Waste and Recycling $ense for Your Business workshops

What the workshop covers

In this half-day workshop, businesses and non-profits can learn how to start or improve a workplace recycling program and how to contract for waste hauling or recycling. The Solid Waste District’s Recycling Specialist walks participants through the steps to launch or expand a successful workplace waste reduction and recycling program. The workshop covers:

  • Starting a recycling program or improving an existing program
  • Recognizing different recyclable commodities
  • Commercial composting
  • Waste sorting (aka “dumpster diving”) and analysis
  • Choosing proper indoor recycling containers and selecting appropriate signage
  • Making the recycling program sustainable
  • Educating employees, students and visitors on the program
  • Choosing a waste hauling and recycling company
  • Terms and conditions of waste and recycling service contracts
  • Types of contracts, fees, and how to structure an agreement to best suit a business

Who should attend

Any business with an interest in effective management of waste and recycling can benefit from these workshops. Previous attendees — large employers, small businesses, startups — have included:

  • Public venues
  • Hotel chains
  • Manufacturing facilities
  • Universities and schools
  • National parks
  • Places of worship
  • Non-profits
  • Local government
  • Property management and real estate development firms
  • Hospitals

Curious about how the workshops might help your organization? Check out the feedback from previous participants (click here and scroll down to “What are attendees saying about the program?”). One recent attendee saved over $26,000 from the information she learned at one of the seminars.

Where and when the workshop is held

The workshop, which will be held at the Solid Waste District offices at 4750 East 131 Street in Garfield Heights (map) (for driving directions, click here), consists of two sessions:

  • Session 1, Successful Recycling in Your Workplace: 3:30 p.m.–5 p.m.
  • Session 2, Contracting for Waste and Recycling Services: 5 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Participants may attend either or both sessions.

The workshops are free, but registration is required. Online registration (click here and scroll down to “Upcoming Seminars”) is available through the Solid Waste District’s website, as is the Solid Waste District’s flyer for the seminars.

More information is available from Business Recycling Specialist Doreen Schreiber at (216) 443-3732 or dschreiber@cuyahogacounty.us.

Want to stay in touch with the latest recycling news in the Cleveland area? Just click on the Follow button at the bottom of my blog Home page, or subscribe to my Examiner.com page.